Why Does the World Hate Pakistan?

Because the jewish people always hated Pakistan and want to side with the Hindus against Pakistan.

Kidding Kidding. There is another reason. First I digress:

Pakistan has written to the Permanent Five complaining about the latest fracas on the border:

“He (Sartaj Aziz) expressed his concern that the ceasefire violations by India and the provocative statements by Indian leadership were not only a setback to peace efforts but also a distraction from Pakistan’s counter-terrorism commitments in the ongoing Operation Zarb-e-Azb (operation in North Waziristan)”

Pakistan probably has to be satisfied with a tepid platitude from the P5, leading to yet another round of soul searching “But why do they hate Pakistan. India has better PR. Pakistan has a trust deficit. Because Jews”. I wanted to get ahead of the curve and give you an answer. You are welcome.

On many issues Pakistan and India have been treated on an equal basis: For example, nuclear sanctions were lifted on both Pakistan and India, the world stepped in restrain India after the attack on India’s parliament, and after attacks in Mumbai and so on. These have given an impression that Pakistan has won an equal treatment based on its moral and righteous position on these issues, and India was chastised for being wrong.

On other occasions, for example during the Kargil crisis or the civil nuclear deal, Pakistan has simply been ignored and has received ignominious treatment vis-a-vis India, confusing Pakistanis on why the international community is so fickle, causing people to soul search “Why Does the World Hate Pakistan?”.

The point is simple. On occasions in which the world has sided with Pakistan, they did so not due to the strength of Pakistan’s moral position, but merely due to the fear of Pakistan’s mischief making potential. Nuclear sanctions were lifted, India was restrained after Parliament and Mumbai attacks because the west needed Pakistan’s cooperation on dealing with the taliban. It was merely an acknowledgement of the magnitude of nuisance Pakistan can create rather than a recognition that Pakistan was in the right and India was in the wrong. Pakistanis (with ample help from the media and analysts) take these affirmations of support as a reaffirmation of Pakistan’s “principled stand” and add one more “diplomatic victory” to the kitty. The reality is that nobody really believes Pakistan had nothing to do with Mumbai attacks, or that AQ Khan exported nukes without Pakistan Army’s help (while Pakistan was ruled by a military dictatorship) or that Osama Bin Laden was chilling in Abbottabad without Pakistan’s knowledge. They just choose to ignore it (for now) as they secure Pakistan’s cooperation in not indulging in mischief, like bombing too many election candidates in Afghanistan.

What fascinates me though is that every one of such “diplomatic victories” secured with the threat of mischief making is passed off by Pakistani intelligentsia, media and leaders as a great victory of Pakistan’s resolute position, moral arguments or principled stand. This sets up for eventual  disappointment like when neither China nor US supported Pakistan’s case in Kargil. Or when “Nuclear” is used in the context of “annihilation” and not “Power plants” when Pakistan is present in the same sentence. Relying on one’s ability to spoil the party does not engender goodwill, it buys resentful tolerance at best.

Coming back to the P5: India-China trade volume is $80 billion, India is negotiating a multi-billion dollar fighter aircraft purchase from France, and multi billion dollar trade pacts with the US. Even China, Pakistan’s taller than mountain, deeper than ocean friend, has a 30% approval rating for Pakistan based on some random Pew study I saw. Think about it from the perspective of the Chinese: Pakistan is a place where Osama was hiding, Xinxiang terrorists get trained, Taliban cool their heels and their hard earned money goes into a bottomless pit. India is a place where they do $80 billion of their trade.

Why does Pakistan think the P5 will support them? The clue lies in:

“Distraction from Pakistan’s counter-terrorism commitments in the ongoing Operation Zarb-e-Azb”

which any diplomat will read as “Support Pakistan else the operation against Taliban will stop and they get a free hand in Afghanistan”.

Pakistan might secure a “diplomatic victory” based on its “principled stand” depending on how credible the world thinks this latest Taliban threat is. But is it any surprise that Jewish people and their nefarious conspiracies are not needed at all for the international community and the P5 to continue hating Pakistan?

The Other Captions of the Other Pakistan

Dawn just wrote an article telling the world that not everyone in Pakistan is a peasant like you and not everyone slums around in a house without a gym and a swimming pool. However I felt the captions in the article could be improved further. Here is yours sachly’s take:

Educationalist and model Fatima (R) uses her mobile phone while her Filipino domestic worker holds her glass of water at her house in Lahore May 28, 2014.Educationalist and model Fatima: “…and that is why I never fail to tell my filipno maid that she should have paid more attention in class. That is why I work for universal access to education so everyone can afford Filipino maids.”

 

Ansa Hasan, a marketing manager at Porsche Pakistan, plays with a parrot at her house in Lahore February 21, 2014.

Ansa Hasan, a marketing manager at Porsche Pakistan:“…where did you get that maid from? Tired of holding my own parrot”

 

Pilates instructor Zainab Abbas (R) smokes a cigarette as she sits with a friend after lunch in Lahore February 19, 2014.

Pilates instructor Zainab Abbas: “Secret to a healthy lifestyle is to avoid unhealthy things. Like carbs. Substitute it with cigarettes if you feel cravings.”

 

Sarah (R) and her brother, artist Usman Ahmed (2nd R), smoke a water pipe, also known as a narghile, as they sit with friends at home in Islamabad May 8, 2014.

Sarah (R) and her brother, artist Usman Ahmed: “Thanks to Pilates instructor Zainab Abbas, my lung capacity has improved considerably”

 

Zahra Afridi (L) talks to a carpenter at a workshop on the outskirts of Islamabad February 10, 2014.

Zahra Afridi: “Talk about the poors ruining photoshoots of my dong chair by hanging out in the background.”

 

Aleena Raza reads a book in her bedroom in Lahore May 29, 2014.

Aleena Raza: “…I know!! Damn it Mariam! Quit ruining my pictures!”

Zahra Afridi (R) kicks a punching bag during a kickboxing training session at her home in Islamabad February 10, 2014.

Zahra Afridi: “…Oh! you noticed. Yes, the tattoo is in Arabic. Pays homage to my religion and my heritage”

 

Interior designer Afridi uses a circular saw as she sculpts a stone guitar outside the Classic Rock Coffee cafe in Islamabad March 8, 2014. Afridi runs her own interior design company.

Interior Designer Zahra Afridi: “Patriarchy has oppressed women and convinced them that eye protection is needed while being showered with sparks from a circular saw. I reject this ideology. Also hoping that none of the poors have been to Hard Rock Café. LoL.”

 

 

Narinder Modi and Challenges to Pakistan

Narinder Modi has been sworn in as the 15th Prime minister of India and the whole of South Asia watches with trepidation. While it is too early to predict the outcome of Modi’s policies, it is instructive to analyze two aspects of this election: The mandate that Modi secured and the reasons behind his unpopularity among Pakistanis.

Modi has been given a massive mandate in terms of seats, but has won only about 31% of the polled votes in India and more importantly, only 0% of Pakistani votes. This election has revealed that the partition of the subcontinent has reduced the Muslim population of India to a level where they cannot influence the elections anymore which was what the Quaid was afraid would happen and therefore insisted on Partition to prevent that from happening, which then happened because of the Partition initiated by the Quaid. Therefore many Pakistanis feel that the Quaid has been vindicated in dividing the Muslim electorate of the subcontinent which would have otherwise constituted 30% to 40% of the electorate. It is important to note that he was not proved right in the last two elections when Congress party won, but was proved right in this election, and only the latest elections matter in such issues.

While Pakistanis find a sliver of vindication due to Modi’s election, he is deeply unpopular among all sections of Pakistani society. The conservative section of Pakistani society has had a historical hatred and distrust of all non-taliban, non-middle eastern personalities implicated in mass murder of Muslims. The nationalistic section of Pakistani society has never forgiven Muslim genocide by South Asians in places outside Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Jordan. The liberal and progressive section of Pakistani society strongly believes that countries should graduate from riots to aerial bombardment using F16s to kill its own citizens. To add to that Pakistani society generally disapproves of nationalism rooted in religion in countries other than Pakistan. (Exception to that is Middle eastern countries. Exception to the exception is Israel.)

Pakistan is now faced with the grave challenge of dealing with an extremist government in her neighbourhood that Pakistan has not secretly funded and trained. Pakistanis concerned about multiculturalism, development and freedom in other places outside Pakistan are rightly concerned that Modi’s prime ministership might cause Polio to run rampant in Muslim majority areas, Muslim schoolgirls and Muslim journalists to be shot and vilified and Muslim owned news channels to be censored under the pretext of blasphemy and made to write silly apology letters.

South Asia is headed into dark and dangerous days indeed.

Indian Elections – A Primer

The impending elections of India, which is an important South Asian country, is the latest event in the rich democratic tradition of South Asia. On this occasion, I join the pious citizens of Islamic Emirate of Pakistan in their dismay about India’s latest fascination with religious nationalism and religious identity-based politics. Around the living rooms, TV shows and street corners, whenever Pakistanis take a well-deserved break from “Is Sharia the best choice for whole of Pakistan or just the best choice for a part of Pakistan?” debate, you can hear their concern and trepidation that the Indian electorate might not make a choice that is religiously impartial, secular, multicultural and tolerant. To understand these issues better, I have presented an essential primer of the chief actors in the fray, so Pakistanis can make better and informed choices in the impending South Asian election.

Narinder Modi: The Burning Hot favorite.

He is the chief Minister of Gujrat and the Prime Ministerial candidate of the Bharatia Janata Party. He is credited with rapid economic development of Gujrat. However, some people rightfully point out that if you take the economic growth of Gujrat, subtract the number of bicycles, divide it by the number of cows and adjust for the number of cricket matches played there in backyards, the resulting number is much worse than the national infant mortality rate. Which goes on to show that when really pressed hard, some math also does not share everyone’s enthusiasm about his skills as an administrator. Then there is the elephant in the room – Modi presided over a massive massacre of Muslims during his watch. No political party has ever won national-level elections after instigating religious riots not involving the Sikhs and a section of Indian electorate is determined to keep it that way. This might prove to be his greatest liability. I have analyzed his electoral prospects in greater detail here.

Political Advice: In the remaining weeks, provoke riots against the Sikhs. Might prove to be an effective tactic to confuse part of supporters of the other party into voting for you.

Rahul Gandhi: The Underdog.

Remember Bollywood movies where the underdog kid from the poor family stands toe to toe against the rich, dumb kid surrounded by a sycophantic coterie and you are moved to rooting for the underdog? Rahul Gandhi is like that. Except he belongs to the ruling party and is not the underdog. And he is rich. Is dumb too. Is surrounded by a sycophantic coterie and the other kid is from a poor background. Very confusing. The main thing is that for some reason he is the underdog — This bollywood movie is about a not-underdog, rich, dumb kid, surrounded by a sycophantic coterie standing toe to toe against a kid from a poor background, but somehow you are moved into supporting the rich kid. Very confusing. Moving on…

Rahul Gandhi arrives with an impressive and long resume. Part of which reads “Father, Mother, Uncle, Grandmother, Great grandfather, Great Great Grandfather…..” but his biggest asset is that he is not Modi and appeals to the “Please not Modi!!”  voters. Which means that his party will not win any admiration for good governance either, which is his biggest liability.

Political Advice: Stop talking. Start praying. Talking only confuses your supporters into voting for the other guy. Praying might prove to be an effective tactic to confuse part of supporters of the other party into voting for you.

I recognize that all this can be very confusing and therefore have made a table for you:

Decision Matrix

If you say “But I dont like any of the options!! Why cant I just take a SMS poll of my friends and ask them who to vote for?!”. Well you are in luck. Let me introduce:

Arvind Kejriwal: The Joker in the Pack

Leader of the Aam Admi Party, the Indian equivalent of Pakistan’s Tehreek-e-Insaf (without the embarrassing love for the taliban, and without the confusing xenophobia mixed with foreign trips). His biggest appeal is to the “Please not Modi!! Too embarrassed to support Rahul” voters. His biggest asset is that he is not Modi. The consequent lack of impressive administrative credentials is balanced by the fact that is not Rahul Gandhi either and hence lacks horrible administrative credentials. The man without riots and without any governance record.

Political Advice: None. In fact, i’d like to take his advice on getting so many twitter followers.

Whatever be the choice, this elections will be keenly watched, contested and commented upon by the Pakistani polity who have always shown a keen interest on matters of good governance, democracy, secularism, multiculturalism and minority rights in foreign countries. One thing is certain, democracy will be the winner in this keenly fought contest in South Asia.

Make Coups Not War

Unless you are hiding under a rock in some cave somewhere, you have probably heard about the huge debate on whether to talk to the Taliban. Since Pakistan is most famous for producing terrorists and newspaper columns about terrorists, I too wanted to add to the national products in more ways than one. Today I will handle the pressing question facing the nation

What to do with the Taliban? Should we fight them or talk to them?

To answer the question, as usual, we have to think what the Quaid would have wanted. Since he is not around, we have to answer it based on our values: Who we are and What we want.

1. Who we are: We are liberals and bitterly oppose capital punishment.

Conducting law-enforcement operations against the Taliban would mean some might get captured and they might even be sentenced to death by the courts after a judicial process. This is unacceptable to most liberal Pakistanis, many of whom bitterly opposed and spoke out against capital punishment for people like Kasab. Therefore, like all liberals in Pakistan, I too favor airstrikes as a means of punishing terrorists instead of inhumane capital punishment after due judicial process.  Airstrikes have been conducted against the Taliban and have had some use — Since the airstrikes began, drone attacks have ceased, because airstrikes have unambiguously demonstrated to the the world that there is no need for US to bomb Pakistan, when Pakistanis are so much better at aerially bombing Pakistan. However unless followed by a military ground offensive, airstrikes are of no use, and I have my reservations against Ground offensives.

2. What we want: Taliban  packed off to other countries without any bloodshed.

Only the most unperceptive would have missed the trend: A reduction in the attacks by Pakistani non-state actors outside Pakistan has coincided with an increase in the attacks by Pakistani non-state actors inside Pakistan. In purely economic terms, this is a case of production piling up in factories due to lack of export opportunities and blockage of trade routes. Exporting  Taliban outside the country can be achieved by a military operation, but is military operation the best choice? Pakistan Army is among the most fearsome in the region, having earned Silver medals in all its wars, but there is an institution which has a much better record of winning contests than even the Pakistan army. It is Pakistan cricket team. To assure success against the Taliban, first they should be invited to a cricket match where there is huge odds that Pakistan cricket team might beat them. Suitably demoralized, we may then conduct negotiations with tough conditions: a Taliban government in exchange for peace. Here is the icing on the cake — Then they can be easily handled by the Army.

While Waziristan is difficult and treacherous terrain for the Army, Islamabad is not. Ask yourself: How many wars has Pakistan army won? Zero. How many Coups have Pakistan army won? All of them! Taliban then can easily be packed off in a Coup, the pliable Taliban sent to neighboring countries and the irreconcilable elements exiled to Saudi Arabia where they belong. This is the best and the least bloody way of handling the Taliban. People who call for immediate ground offensive against the Taliban forget one basic golden fact in Pakistan’s history: Pakistan’s wars have been bloody, but coups have been peaceful. So

Make coups not war.

Editor’s note 1: Next column will answer the pressing question “After Pakistanis have conquered all of Pakistan by 2016, should we conquer India or Afghanistan next?”

Editor’s note 2: “Should we have a Waziristan operation” debate was first held by people of Indus Valley Civilization, after which they have been holding it regularly every year ever since. Young reporters should cut their teeth covering the Waziristan operation debate, as it provides steady employment year after year, all year round.

September 2009: No decision on Waziristan operation yet: Malik

Pakistan has yet to decide whether it should launch a full-scale military operation in Waziristan to tackle the Taliban, says Interior Minister Rehman Malik. But he told Reuters in an interview in London on Sunday that Pakistan would take whatever action was needed to flush out the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), which he described as “the front face of Al Qaeda”, from tribal areas bordering Afghanistan.

April 2010: Pakistan, in Shift, Weighs Attack on Militant Lair

The Pakistani military, long reluctant to heed American urging that it attack Pakistani militant groups in their main base in North Waziristan, is coming around to the idea that it must do so, in its own interests.

May 2010: Pakistan, US agree on Waziristan operation

Diplomatic sources in Washington, while talking to Dawn, also confirmed this, saying that Pakistan had agreed in principle to extend its military operation to North Waziristan and other areas identified by the Americans as militant hideouts.

November 2010: Pakistan hits back at American support for India by stopping al-Qaeda offensive

Pakistan military chiefs say they are unable to open a fresh front while they are still heavily committed to operations elsewhere in the country’s lawless border regions. “The main reason is that they would need about three divisions to be successful, and there would be political and terrorist attacks to deal with,” said a military official. “How many more problems can Pakistan cope with? “On top of that, Obama’s recent trip to India is rather unhelpful and has dampened any enthusiasm there might have been.”

December 2010: Operation in Waziristan underway, no need for another: Gen. Asif

Core Commander Peshawar Lieutenant General Asif Yasin, on Monday, ruled out rumors regarding a fresh offensive against terrorists, saying that an operation in North Waziristan is underway. While speaking with journalists, he said that the army is targeting terrorists already.

May 2011: Pakistan to launch operation in North Waziristan: Report

Pakistan has decided to launch an air and ground military offensive in North Waziristan, the main sanctuary for al Qaeda and Taliban on the border with Afghanistan, a report in The News said on Monday.

June 2011: Reports about N. Waziristan offensive denied: Operation not imminent, says corps commander

One of Pakistan’s top military commanders ruled out on Wednesday an imminent offensive in North Waziristan, contradicting reports that the country had agreed to assault the militant-infested region following pressure from the United States.

September 2011: North Waziristan: Army brass votes down Haqqani manhunt

Pakistan will not take military action against the Haqqani network, despite intense US pressure over the past few days. The decision was taken at a special meeting of top commanders on Sunday and is likely to chip away at the deteriorating relationship between the two countries. The commanders vowed to resist US demands for an offensive in North Waziristan but also discussed the possible implications of unilateral action by the US on Pakistani territory, said a military official. “We have already conveyed to the US that Pakistan cannot go beyond what it has already done,” the official told The Express Tribune on condition of anonymity.

August 2012: Pakistan preparing for Waziristan operation: Panetta

On Monday, US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta told AP news agency that Pakistan had decided to launch a military operation against the Pakistani Taliban in North Waziristan. Also on Monday, Pakistan’s Army Chief Gen Ashfaq Parvez Kayani called for national unity “in the battle against terrorism.” Earlier this week, a Pakistani security official urged US and Nato forces to seal the Afghan border from their side if Pakistan launched an operation against the militants.

October 2012: North Waziristan operation under consideration: Malik

Pakistan’s Interior Minister Rehman Malik on Friday said that the government was considering a military operation in the tribal badlands of North Waziristan, DawnNews reported. Speaking to reporters upon his arrival at the Karachi Airport, the interior minister said that the tribal region of North Waziristan agency is the hub of terrorists. Malik said that the entire nation was united against the “Zaliman”, an Urdu term meaning “oppressors” which he used to describe Taliban militants.

October 2012: N. Waziristan operation put on hold again?

Talking to journalists on Monday, Interior Minister Rehman Malik conceded that no operation in the area was being planned.

His response followed military’s statement over the weekend that a political decision was needed to launch the offensive for dislodging Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TPP) and its local affiliates from their headquarters in the tribal agency.

January 2013: Govt prefers dialogue to military operation: Kaira

Information Minister Qamar Zaman Kaira said on Thursday the government generally preferred holding talks with militants to launching military operation against them because negotiations were the preferred mode of dispute resolution.

General Raheel Sharif — Profile and Prospects

General Kayani’s term has ended and a new Chief of Army Staff, General Raheel Sharif has been chosen by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif as the next Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan. This practice of Prime Minister choosing COAS followed by COAS choosing Prime minister is called “Circle of Life” in Pakistan and is an essential part of its political structure. In accordance with the solemn tradition practiced since independence, such a transition of power is commemorated in Pakistan with frivolous articles filled with bogus facts and inaccuracies profiling the new Chief. This article filled with ungrounded speculation written by someone with no information or expertise whatsoever is a fitting tribute to that tradition.

General Raheel Sharif, like all Chiefs of Army Staff of Pakistan (at the time of their appointment and before they conducted their coups), is a professional soldier with no political ambition and healthy respect for democracy. How these attributes will change after he conducts a coup is anyone’s guess. To understand the expectations from General Raheel Sharif and his possible policy decisions, it is important to understand the achievements of his predecessor General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani:

General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, who, according to many, is one of the best “thinking generals” of Pakistan army has had an impressive tenure. It is well known that the four* canonical expectations of an ideal Pakistani COAS is

  1. Not losing a war with India
  2. Not conducting a coup
  3. Not rigging elections
  4. Retiring when it is due

and Kayani managed three out of the four. While this by itself does not sound impressive, it is a  400% improvement over his predecessor General Pervez Musharraf who managed to score a zero on four in his tenure and is outstanding considering that very few COAS in the history of Pakistan have measured up to these expectations.

General Raheel Sharif will be held to the same exacting standards as General Kayani’s achievements and therefore has leeway to violate only one of the four canonical expectations. However, his choices are even more constrained — It is important to note the window of opportunity to conduct a coup or rig elections has closed shut in Pakistan. An increasingly assertive judiciary and a vibrant media has made coups all but impossible and stripped Pakistan Army of its traditional power over the civilians. The once all-powerful Pakistan army has now retreated to only controlling the foreign policy, the ISI, all aspects of internal and external security, beating up errant journalists, extra judicial killings, policymaking in sensitive provinces like Balochistan, wheeling-dealings with all manner of “non-state actors”, and the nuke button. Some would say that Pakistan Army has even been rendered toothless — the power to unilaterally nuke India and getting Pakistan annihilated in subsequent Indian retaliation is hardly a symbol of power or a compensation for the inability to freely conduct coups.

With the possibility of Coup out of the window and rigging all but ruled out, General Sharif has a difficult choice: giving himself extensions or losing a war with India?

Only time will tell.

*Some argue “Not conducting a genocide” should be in the list of canonical expectation of Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan. Others contend that this would lead to a slippery slope which could lead to the prohibition of extra-judicial killings. Such a prohibition is unacceptable to many.

 

How To Write Strategic Analysis on FATA

So you want to become a strategic analyst with expertise on geostrategic stratetgic strategy like yours truly and want to write a strategic analysis of FATA like this Nashun Article which helpfully asks “Will Pakistan Own FATA?“. How do you go about doing it? Well simple!! AQ Khan it from all over the web (including your own articles written before)!!

Article Says:

A semi-autonomous tribal region in northwestern Pakistan, bordering Pakistan’s provinces of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan to the east and south, and Afghanistan’s provinces of Kunar, Nangarhar, Paktia, Khost and Paktika to the west and north, FATA comprise seven tribal agencies (districts) and six frontier regions, and are directly governed by Pakistan’s federal government through a special set of laws called the Frontier Crimes Regulations (FCR).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federally_Administered_Tribal_Areas Says:

a semi-autonomous tribal region in northwestern Pakistan, bordering Pakistan’s provinces of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan to the east and south, and Afghanistan’s provinces of Kunar, Nangarhar, Paktia, Khost and Paktika to the west and north. The Federally Administered Tribal Areas comprise seven tribal agencies (districts) and six frontier regions, and are directly governed by Pakistan’s federal government through a special set of laws called the Frontier Crimes Regulations (FCR).

Article Says:

Frontier Crimes Regulation; a body of law based on six chapters, 64 sections three schedules governs Fata, a British-era colonial Act that empowers a political agent to take all actions on behalf of the Pakistan government.

http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/columns/06-Aug-2013/understanding-pashtunwali Says

Frontier Crimes Regulation; a body of law based on six chapters, 64 sections three schedules governs Fata, a British-era colonial Act that empowers a political agent to take all actions on behalf of the Pakistan government.

Article Says:

Commissioners, additional Commissioners Political Agents and Assistants to these agents all have jurisdiction over FATA exercising executive and judicial powers.

http://www.fatareforms.org/summary-of-2011-amendments-to-the-frontier-crimes-regulation/  Says:

Commissioners, additional commissioners, political agents and assistant political agents are all executive officers with jurisdiction over FATA; all of them also exercise judicial power.

Article Says:

Article 247 of the constitution of Pakistan grants a special status to FATA, whereby no act of Parliament or the jurisdiction of the High /Supreme Judiciary is extendable to the region.

http://www.fatareforms.org/failure-fata-development-policy-zahir-shah-safi/ Says

Article 247 of the constitution of Pakistan grants a special status to FATA, whereby no act of parliament or the jurisdiction of the high /supreme judiciary is extendable to the region.

Article Says:

 The separation of powers in a democracy is to prevent abuse of power and to safeguard freedom for all.

http://www.parlament.gv.at/ENGL/PERK/PARL/POL/ParluGewaltenteilung/index.shtml Says:

The separation of powers in a democracy is to prevent abuse of power and to safeguard freedom for all.

Article Says:

The doctrine is associated with the French philosopher Montesquieu, and the clearest example of this is found in the American Constitution where the legislative power of the federation is vested in a Congress, the executive power is vested in the President, and the judicial power in the Supreme Court.

http://www.findlaw.com.au/articles/201/the-relationship-between-the-legislature-executive.aspx Says:

The doctrine is associated with the French philosopher Montesquieu, and the clearest example of this is found in the American Constitution where the legislative power of the federation is vested in a Congress, the executive power is vested in the President, and the judicial power in the Supreme Court

Article Says:

Thomas Jefferson states, “The first principle of a good government is certainly a distribution of its powers into executive, judiciary, and legislative, and a subdivision of the latter into two or three branches.” ( Stated to John Adams, 1787. ME 6:321)

http://famguardian.org/Subjects/Politics/ThomasJefferson/jeff1070.htm Says:

“The first principle of a good government is certainly a distribution of its powers into executive, judiciary, and legislative, and a subdivision of the latter into two or three branches.” –Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, 1787. ME 6:321

Article Says:

FATA a much ignored and backward area in Pakistan, it needs more educational institutions, better healthcare, more micro-investment and generally an improved quality of life for its people.

http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/columns/22-Oct-2013/pak-us-relations-in-perspective Says:

FATA a much ignored and backward area in Pakistan needs more educational institutions, better healthcare, more micro-investment and generally an improved quality of life for its people.

Article Says:

Comprising of seven agencies of Bajaur, Mohmand, Khyber, Orakzai, Kurram, North Waziristan, South Waziristan; and six frontier regions (FRs) of DI khan, Tank, Lukki, Bannu, Kohat, and Peshawar

http://www.fatareforms.org/failure-fata-development-policy-zahir-shah-safi/  Says:

It comprises of seven agencies of Bajaur, Mohmand, Khyber, Orakzai, Kurram, North Waziristan, South Waziristan; and six frontier regions (FRs) of DI khan, Tank, Lukki, Bannu, Kohat, and Peshawar.

Article Says:

FATA continues to be a legacy of the system established by pre-partition British India.

http://www.fatareforms.org/failure-fata-development-policy-zahir-shah-safi/  Says:

The present political administrative structure of FATA is a legacy of the system established by pre-partition British India.

Article Says:

No major initiative for the development of FATA was taken in 1980’s and in 1990’s except the introduction of adult franchise in 1997

http://www.fatareforms.org/failure-fata-development-policy-zahir-shah-safi/ Says:

No major initiative for the development of FATA was taken in 1980’s and in 1990’s except the introduction of adult franchise in 1997.

Moral of the story is: Pakistan may or may not own FATA, but consider anything on the internet as your own when you write article about FATA!!! Hoping to see many more strategic analysts soon!!